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Modeling

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How to Manage Your Data Relationships

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Welcome to the Modeling section of the Guided Learning course for Power BI. This section shows you how to get your connected data ready for use, using Power BI Desktop. Often, you'll connect to more than one data source to create your reports, and you'll need all of that data to work together. Modeling is how you get it there.

To create a logical connection between different data sources, you create a relationship. A relationship between data sources enables Power BI to know how those tables relate to one another, allowing you to create interesting visuals and reports. This section explains relationships (only the data-centric ones, though), and even shows you how to create relationships when none exists.

As always in this course, your learning journey follows the same path as the flow of work in Power BI. We'll still be in Power BI Desktop for most of this section, but the work done here has direct affect on working in the Power BI service.

Introduction to Modeling Your Data

Now that we've reviewed how to import your data and transform it, it's time to start modeling.

One of Power BI's strengths is that you don't need to flatten your data into one table. Instead, you can use multiple tables from multiple sources, and define the relationship between them. You can also create your own custom calculations and assign new metrics to view specific segments of your data, and use these new measures in visualizations for easy modeling.

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