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How to Manage Your Data Relationships

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Power BI allows you to visually set the relationship between tables or elements. To see a diagrammatic view of your data, use the Relationship view, found on the far left side of the screen next to the Report canvas.

From the Relationships view, you can see a block that represents each table and its columns, and lines between them to represent relationships.

Adding and removing relationships is simple. To remove a relationship, right-click on it and select Delete. To create a relationship, drag and drop the fields that you want to link between tables.

To hide a table or individual column from your report, right-click on it in the Relationship view and select Hide in Report View.

For a more detailed view of your data relationships, select Manage Relationships in the Home tab. This will open the Manage Relationships dialog, which displays your relationships as a list instead of a visual diagram. From here you can select Autodetect to find relationships in new or updated data. Select Edit in the Manage Relationships dialog to manually edit your relationships. This is also where you can find advanced options to set the Cardinality and Cross-filter direction of your relationships.

Your options for Cardinality are Many to One, and One to One. Many to One is the fact to dimension type relationship, for example a sales table with multiple rows per product being matched up with a table listing products in their own unique row. One to One is used often for linking single entries in reference tables.

By default, relationships will be set to cross-filter in both directions. Cross-filtering in just one direction limited some of the modeling capabilities in a relationship.

Setting accurate relationships between your data allows you to create complex calculations across multiple data elements.

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